Moonrise by Sarah Crossan

Every verse novel of Sarah Crossan’s has been getting better and better and this is no exception. She just picks the absolute best characters to write about and tells stories you don’t normally hear that mean you can’t put the book down until it’s done.

Moonrise tells the story of Joe, who’s brother, Ed, is on death row. He hasn’t seen him in ten years, and now that he’s been given a death date, he decides to move to Texas for the opportunity to reconnect with him, and get the truth about what happened the day he was arrested.

What I loved about the story was how unassuming it was. It could have been from Ed’s perspective, and been a huge mystery like The Life of David Gale, that film with Kevin Spacey and Kate Winslet. Instead, with the focus on Joe, there’s a stronger emphasis on strength and family and needing support. If you want to get angry about the justice system, watch the film instead, because while it does get mentioned, trying to save Ed is never at the heart of the book, it’s more about both brothers coming to terms with his fate.

My favourite moments of the book were Ed’s letters to Joe – the last one definitely had me tearing up – and when Nell turned up in Joe’s life because it was such a sweet and real relationship against a harsh reality that offered Joe some escape.

While the prospect of counting down the days until your brother dies sounds morbid, Moonrise strikes the perfect balance between touching and melancholy, never fully dipping into complete sadness, but never letting you forget that life is unfair sometimes.

Succinct and moving, I’m giving Moonrise 4 stars, and it’s definitely going to be something I’m thinking about for months to come!

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Review: We Come Apart by Sarah Crossan and Brian Conaghan

25310356We Come Apart by Sarah Crossan and Brian Conaghan
Genre: Verse, Contemporary
Publisher: Bloomsbury Children’s
Pages: 320
Format: ARC ebook
Rating: ★★★.5
Note: We received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 

As you can see from the cover, these authors are critically acclaimed. Sarah Crossan won the Carnegie Medal for her verse book about conjoined twins, One, which Maddie adored in 2015. We also knew we desperately wanted to read this because we’re going to meet the authors at an event and this is the book they’re promoting. All we knew before going in was that it’s written in verse and the poems are from two perspectives: Jess, a mild kleptomaniac and is forced by her mother’s partner, Terry, to film her mum whenever he beats her, and Nicu, a refugee that has to start going to school where he is bullied to a horrifying extent.

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Review: Resist by Sarah Crossan

resistResist by Sarah Crossan
Genre: Dystopian, Sci-Fi
Published by: Bloomsbury
Pages: 360
Format: Paperback
Series: Breathe (#1)
Rating: ★★★★

Luckily, I didn’t have to find out what happened next in the sequel to Breathe, because my local library has had the second book in stock for ages and finally I got to pick it up! I really loved the first book and was super excited to see how the series would conclude. I can happily say that I liked the ending and to a certain extent, wish there had been more!

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Duology Recommendations!

This year has definitely been the year that we discovered duologies. They’re perfect! The trilogy has been done to death, and usually they follow the same pattern: the first one is the best, the second one takes a dip and depending, the third is either a nose dive to disappointment or a jump to satisfaction. With a duology, there’s less chance of what we like to call ‘Second Book Syndrome’.

So, which ones are well worth reading?

Fearsome Dreamer and The Illusionists by Laure Eve

Not only do you get a beautiful set of covers, these two books are absolutely phenomenal. For only two books, it feels like you’re reading seven because of the different point of view and locations explored throughout. The world is extremely well built, the characters are so varied, your bound to love at least one of them, (Rue and White, forever ♡) and the story…boy, I can’t even describe it. Imagine Under the Never Sky mixed with The Chronicles of Prydain and you’re pretty much there.

Pivot Point and Split Second by Kasie West

These books are perfect if you love the paranormal and contemporary genres. Addie has the power to see outcomes of a choice. Should she live with her Mum or her Dad, and what consequences will that have on her love life, her best friend, and the secret mind-power society she lives in? You get to read the two outcomes, both action packed and loveable, and be shocked and thrilled by what Addie chooses. The second book adds her best friend, Laila’s perspective to the mix, and deals with the aftermath of Addie’s choice. Seriously, could not recommend enough!

The Perfectionists and The Good Girls by Sara Shepard

Love Pretty Little Liars? This is practically the same thing, but in two books instead of sixteen! Perfect! These are about how six girls are affected by the murder of the high school’s most popular guy, Nolan Hotchkiss. Each girl is suspected in a slightly different way, and deals with a lot of personal drama amongst a murder inquiry. Are the girls really as perfect and good as they appear? And who’s going down for a murder they may or may not have committed?
Packed with the same drama and plot twists as PLL, this is a fast paced duology bound to leave you with an open jaw on the final page.

Vivian Versus the Apocalypse and Vivian Versus America by Katie Coyle

This duology takes a completely different turn to the other recommendations. About a girl called Vivian and her best friend Harp, trying to survive the aftermath of a religious cult takeover, stealing family members and bringing about the second coming. If it sounds intense, that’s because it is! But, despite the manic plot, the relationship between the girls

Breathe and Resist by Sarah Crossan

If you hate to see trilogies suffer from second book syndrome then the Breathe duology is perfect for you! It’s a fast-paced dystopian where the amount of oxygen you’re allowed is controlled by the Pod Leaders. The books are told from four different PoVs throughout the series so you get to see every part of the world, both Inside and Out, rebel and victim! If you liked the Under The Never Sky trilogy then this should definitely make your TBR!

Reboot and Rebel by Amy Tintera

After death humans can reboot, but the longer it takes the less human they are when they return. It took Wren Connolly 178 minutes to reboot, making her one of the toughest girls around. In the facility where the reboots live, Wren trains the newbies where she meets 22 Callum. This duology has something for everyone, romance, conspiracy, and a ton of action that will have you on the edge of your seat!

Review: Breathe by Sarah Crossan

breatheBreathe by Sarah Crossan
Genre:
Dystopian, Romance, Sci-Fi
Published by: Bloomsbury
Pages: 373
Format: Paperback
Series: Resist (#2)
Rating: ★★★.5

I’ll admit it here and now, this was a bit of a cover buy. After reading Under the Never Sky and eventually really liking it, I thought I would give this series a try, since it seemed pretty similar! In a world where there are no longer any trees, your oxygen is controlled by Breathe and unless you’re Privileges, you lead a very restricted life. Quinn is Privileged and Bea is not, but they’re not about to let their caste dictate their friendships, together they leave the Pod and get caught up in RATS, the rebellion that wants to expose Breathe and forge a new world where everyone has the right to breathe.

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Review: One by Sarah Crossan

OneOne by Sarah Crossan
Genre: Contemporary, Twin Fiction
Published by: Bloomsbury Children’s Books
Pages: 448
Format: ARC E-Book
Rating: ?
Where to Find: Goodreads | Amazon | Author

‘One’ was definitely an interesting and enlightening read. It’s about conjoined twins, Tippi and Grace and their lives. Being a twin myself, I love reading about twins, to see how authors deal with the relationship, as it’s definitely different from older-younger sibling relationships. Crossan did a great job in portraying the emotional closeness of the pair, and the strength they found in each other really shone through the novel. Before I get on with the review, I think anyone and everyone should read this, whether it’s their type of book or not, just because it’s different and eye-opening, regardless of ratings others give it!

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